FILE – In this Sept. 20,2016 file photo, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass. speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. Warren accused the Education Department on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016, of moving forward with debt collection against nearly 80,000 former students of Corinthian Colleges, despite federal and state findings that the now-defunct for-profit chain defrauded students. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

Sen. Elizabeth Warren was candid about issues with Obamacare Monday, saying that did not go far enough to be transformative when it was passed.

In a closed door meeting with the Democracy Alliance, the Massachusetts senator connected the problems with Obamacare to the Democratic Party’s failure to connect with middle America voters that turned to Donald Trump during the 2016 presidential election.

“But let’s be honest: It’s not bold. It’s not transformative,” Warren reportedly said of the Affordable Care Act.

Sen. Warren said in the meeting that the Democratic party needs to show Americans how the party fights for the “little guy,” the Boston Globe reported.

Warren pointed to two central problems in gathering and uniting voters, according to the Globe. The issues surrounding Obamacare and the 2009 economic stimulus package in response to the 2008 economic crash were Warren’s central points in the meeting.

Warren also said that Democrats were too quick to strike up a compromise with Republicans on the stimulus package.

Attendants of the meeting said that Warren expressed that the Democratic Party failed not in its messaging, but in its ideology, according to the Huffington Post.

Democracy Alliance was holding a three-day investment conference with rich liberal donors to determine where the Democratic Party will go now that Donald Trump has was become the president-elect, Hillary Clinton has suffered a devastating loss last week.

Democracy Alliance is a progressive donor network with rich liberal contributors like George Soros. The conference included Democratic leaders like Warren, Nancy Pelosi and Keith Ellison.

On the Affordable Care Act, Donald Trump stayed firm on his promise during his 2016 campaign that he would fully repeal and replace Obamacare, calling it an “incredible economic burden.” On Friday, the president-elect told the Wall Street Journal that he may want to keep parts of the Affordable Care Act and amend other parts of the legislation.